En cours
A Venir
Billetterie
Collections en ligne
Actualités
Boutique
Restaurants et privatisation

Thématique

Maillol and Greece

Maillol’s relationship with Greek sculpture partly determined his place in twentieth-century sculpture.

 

5 MINUTES

Maillol et la grèce

Le rapport qu’entretient Maillol 
à la sculpture grecque détermine 
en partie la place qu’il tient dans 
la sculpture du XXème siècle.
 

temps de lecture : 1h30m

Maillol’s relationship with Greek sculpture partly determined his place in twentieth-century sculpture. Very early on, art critics and biographers associated Maillol with Greece, making him a legacy of ancient Greek sculpture, living like an Arcadian shepherd in his remote Banyuls farmhouse. But this legend of “Maillol the Greek” must be qualified, for unlike an academic or classical sculptor, Maillol did not make Greek sculpture an absolute rule that would dictate the way he conceived his work. Instead, he preferred to resonate with it.

 Although Maillol visited Greece in the summer of 1908, it would be a mistake to think that he did not already possess a profound knowledge of its art. This involved visits to the Louvre, reading books and, above all, researching photographs. Maillol was thus largely familiar with this style, but his work evolved in very different directions: he did not compose according to predefined canons, but rather sensitively according to an architecture and volume that he alone determined. Nor was he particularly interested in late Hellenistic sculpture or the classical period dominated by the sculptor Phidias. He preferred the so-called “severe” style: his predilection was for the sculptures in the Temple of Zeus at Olympia [ill. 1].

Maillol assis au musée d’Olympie

ill 1. Maillol seated at the Olympia Museum, in front of the sculptures on the western pediment of the Temple of Zeus, between 14 and 17 May, 1908, photography Harry Kessler, archive de la Fondation Dina Vierny – Musée Maillol.

“ Il préfère le style dit « sévère » : sa prédilection va vers les sculptures du temple de Zeus à Olympie ”

Aristide Maillol

Parcours du voyage en Grèce : voir « du marbre au soleil »

Aristide Maillol, lettre à Maurice Denis

ill. 2 Aristide Maillol, letter to Maurice Denis, c. 1907, archive Musée départemental Maurice Denis – Archives départementales des Yvelines) inv. : Ms. 11842 – disponible en ligne : https://archives.yvelines.fr/rechercher/archives-en-ligne/correspondances-du-musee-departemental-maurice-denis

Travels in Greece: To "see marble in the sun"

As early as 1904, following a brief stay together in London, Count Kessler and Maillol were contemplating a trip to Greece. Indeed, on visiting the British Museum, which boasts a considerable collection of antiques, Maillol told Kessler: “This trip to London has been a ray of light for me. I understood sculpture and art in general better. In Paris, the Phidias had always surprised me a little, but here, I understood them.” In a way, this visit was Maillol’s first “real” contact with Greek antiquity.

Maillol dreamed of travelling to Greece.  In 1907, he wrote to Maurice Denis that he would like to sit under the Erechtheion for a month: “That’s what I see as a great joy for the moment” [ill. 2]. In 1908, the project became a reality. Pierre Camo points out in his biography of Maillol that this trip was the most important event of his life. It was the place where Maillol could finally see the statues in situ: “I would like to see marble statues outside, in the country where they were made”, he wrote to Pierre Camo. To Maurice Denis, he adds: “I can’t hide my great joy at seeing a Greek temple, marble columns in full sunlight and even sculpture outside. […] What counts above all, I believe, more than going to see the masterpiece of architecture, is that I will see marble in the sun”.

Finally, Maillol traveled with Count Kessler to Greece from April 25 to June 3, 1908. This trip is known from two main sources: the first is Kessler’s diary [Ill. 3], the second is highly significant in that it’s a travel notebook, filled with notes and a few sketches, which Maillol undertook during his stay. This is a rare practice for the artist, and proves the extraordinary nature of this trip for him.

Although Austrian writer Hugo von Hofmannsthal was present at the beginning, he left the trip, not satisfied with what he saw and feeling that he was intruding too much on the duo of Kessler and Maillol [ill. 4].

ill. 4 Aristide Maillol and Hugo von Hofmannsthal in Delphi, May 1908, photography Harry Kessler, Marbach, Deutsches Literaturarchiv Marbach | © Deutsches Literaturarchiv Marbach, Nachlass Harry Graf Kessler.

ill. 3 Harry Kessler, Journal, facsimile of the manuscript, 13 and 14 May 1908, with a photograph taken by Harry Kessler, depicting Aristide Maillol on the site of Apollo's temple at Delphi, Marbach, Deutsches Literaturarchiv Marbach | © Deutsches Literaturarchiv Marbach, Nachlass Harry Graf Kessler.

je ne vous cache pas ma grande joie de voir un temple grec, des colonnes de marbre en plein soleil et même de la sculpture dehors. […] Ce qui compte surtout ma foi plus que d’aller voir le chef-d’œuvre de l’architecture c’est que je verrai du marbre au soleil

Aristide Maillol

Regards de Maillol sur la Grèce

Maillol’s View of Greece

One of the reasons for Hofmannsthal’s departure was that Greece was nothing like what he had expected. Maillol, on the other hand, did not feel out of place. Paradoxically, the artist was struck by the resemblance between the Greek landscapes and those of the Banyuls countryside. “I feel like I’m in my own village, moreover, the vegetation being the same, the illusion would be complete if the spaces here weren’t multiplied 10 times”, he notes [ill. 5].

The first impressions of Greece mentioned in the travel diary are of the landscape. He describes very briefly “a winding path first aspects of the house on a burnt hill houses painted pink and blue, I see a motif to paint right away – I say I’ll paint that, because I fully intend to take some paintings home as a souvenir.” He was true to his word, and two small paintings have survived from this trip [ill. 6 et ill. 7] representing ancient monuments. The use of dewy light shows Maillol’s interest in the way it reflected off the whiteness of the stones.

Maillol was also sensitive to everyday life. Throughout the trip, he commented on and sketched the passers-by and the clothes they wore: “the road is very pretty everywhere – we’re really in Greece – everywhere the peasants really look happy – their costume is very curious – their legs are very constricted and molded in white breeches – pointed leather shoes topped with an oupe [sic – for: tassel] – white petticoat – or goat’s hair cap” [ill. 8 et ill. 9].

image 1

ill. 5 Aristide Maillol at Olympia in the ruins of the supposed « atelier of Phidias », between 16 and 18 May 1908, photography Harry Kessler, archive de la Fondation Dina Vierny – Musée Maillol.

image 1

ill. 5
 Aristide Maillol at Olympia in the ruins of the supposed « atelier of Phidias », between 16 and 18 May 1908, photography Harry Kessler, archive de la Fondation Dina Vierny – Musée Maillol.

ill. 7 Paysage de Grèce, l’Acropole, May 1908, oil on canvas, 30×40 cm, Fondation Dina Vierny – Musée Maillol.

ill. 6 Le temple d’Athéna sur l’Acropole, May 1908, oil on canvas, 21×4-30 cm, Fondation Dina Vierny – Musée Maillol.

In early May, in the vicinity of Delphi, Maillol and Kessler learned of a three-day festival in the village of Arachova, which they reached by mule [ill. 10]. The artist was astonished by the similarity of the dance to those of his native region, particularly the “contrapàs” dance [ill. 11]. Maillol also commented on works of art: the first cited was the “Apollo at the Omphalos”, which he praised for “the serenity of its powerful form without any frivolity”.

Through this trip, Maillol wished to see Greece in its entirety, and no longer in the bits and pieces seen in museums; he wanted to look at works of art in their original climate. This aspiration, described to Pierre Camo and Maurice Denis, to observe Greek productions under the light and in the open air is fully satisfied: “I have here in the ruins the joy of finally seeing what I had come to look for a statue in the open air – but alas completely mutilated – it’s equal I see it all bathed in light the shadow doesn’t exist here – the air is so pure that the shadow is as luminous as the light” [ill. 12].

This reflection of sculpture in its natural environment and its interaction with light is in fact a long-standing preoccupation in the sculptor’s practice. Indeed, Maillol refers to his sculpture Méditerranée as a “young girl in the open air”, underlining the role of the surrounding atmosphere in bringing the figure to life.

ill 8. Page du carnet de voyage d’Aristide Maillol : croquis d’un berger ou paysan grec, folio 53, mai 1908, archive de la Fondation Dina Vierny – Musée Maillol.

ill. 8 Page of the travel notebook of Aristide Maillol : sketch of a Greek shepherd or farmer , folio 53, May 1908, archive de la Fondation Dina Vierny – Musée Maillol.

ill. 9 Un berger grec, photographe Harry Kessler, mai 1908, archive de la Fondation Dina Vierny – Musée Maillol.

ill. 10 Aristide Maillol à dos de mulet en route vers Arachova, photographe Harry Kessler, 7 mai 1908, archive de la Fondation Dina Vierny – Musée Maillol.

ill 11. Une danse grecque pendant une fête dans le village d’Arachova, c. 7-10 mai 1908, photographe Harry Kessler, archive de la Fondation Dina Vierny – Musée Maillol.
ill 12. Vue d’une sculpture dans une ruine, mai 1908, photographe Harry Kessler, Archives de la Fondation Dina Vierny – Musée Maillol.

Dialogue avec son oeuvre

ill. 13  Sculpture of « the Seated Slave », East pediment of the Temple of Zeus, preserved in the Olympia Museum, April – June 1908, photography Harry Kessler, archives de la Fondation Dina Vierny – Musée Maillol.

ill. 14 La Méditerranée, 1923, terre cuite, 18,2 x 13 cm,
Fondation Dina Vierny – Musée Maillol.

ill. 14
La Méditerranée, 1923, terracotta , 18,2 x 13 cm, Fondation Dina Vierny – Musée Maillol.

Dialogue with his Oeuvre

The experience Maillol gained from his trip to Greece at the age of forty-seven was not one of apprenticeship. He was no longer a young artist seeking new models or sources of inspiration for his future work. Rather, it was a form of resonance, a confirmation of his art and thinking. Seeing the Greek works in situ confirmed for him the accuracy of the aesthetic formulas he had been developing in sculpture since the 1900s.

He was particularly fond of the antiques, which bore a certain affinity to some of his works. For example, he praised the figure of the “seated slave” on the eastern façade of the Temple of Zeus, preserved in the Olympia Museum, whose position is a masculine counterpart to his own small study for Méditerranée [ill. 13e ill. 14].

Maillol praised the simplicity of this sculpture to Kessler: “Yes, they [the Greek sculptors] didn’t look for noon and two o’clock, those people, like the moderns: it’s simple… like nature.” Maillol sees in this the principle of formal simplification that makes the work appear in its entirety to the viewer, a principle he had already attempted to implement in Méditerranée.

Maillol’s thinking on ancient art was therefore original, and he saw it not as a model to be followed, but as a legacy to be discarded in order to find a new expression in sculpture. Thus, he criticized Bourdelle for making Herakles or Minerva. “Are we in Greece to make Minerves? You have to do things in your own time. He’s never been able to do a nude woman”. For this reason, Maillol told Kessler that he would “rather be a fool in front of nature than a scientist”.

For example, Maillol drew a few works based on the antiques he had seen in museums or monuments [ill. 15],but the work resulting from this journey in no way draws its aesthetics from antiquity, but rather from Maillol’s view of nature, based on a male model – a rare subject in his sculptural output.

ill. 15
Page of a travel notebook : annotated sketch « erectheion [sic] et parthénon », folio 102, May – June 1908, archive de la Fondation Dina Vierny – Musée Maillol.

Un nu masculin Grec

A Greek Male Nude

Aside from a few drawings of sculptures and monuments, the only work Maillol brought back from his trip was a male nude painted from life, with no reference to ancient aesthetics.

The period of the trip to Greece corresponds to a particular focus on the male nude. Maillol seemed so interested in this question that he assured Kessler that he would use what he had seen in Greece to execute “a man towards whom I am moving”. More specifically, he intended to draw on “the Apollo Omphalos” and “the Doryphorus” – photographed by Kessler [ill. 16] – and on-site graphic and modeling studies [ill. 17 et ill. 18].

At the end of their stay, between May 23 and 29, Maillol looked at and drew met on the beach at Phalère. He then asked one of these bathers, Angelos Mantheou Chromatopoulos, to pose for a statue. Maillol enthused: “With models like these, it’s no wonder they [Greek artists] were great sculptors.” His approach was thus to seek out what an ancient Greek sculptor might have seen “in nature”.

ill17 & ill. 18 Etudes, figures masculines dans diverses poses, from a sketchbook, May 1908, Fondation Dina Vierny – Musée Maillol.

 

“ Sommes-nous en Grèce pour faire des Minerves ? Il faut faire des choses de son temps. Il n’a jamais été foutu de faire une femme nue. ”

Aristide Maillol

On the beach, he found a piece of wood to serve as a support, as well as wire, flexible wood and wire cloth to serve as a base. The hotel owner offered them a shady corner of the garden to use as an improvised workshop [Ill. 19].

The clay used on site has yet to be identified. However, on his return to France, Maillol did not forget the sculpture he had created in 1908, but it was not until 1930 that he produced a bronze based on this study, a copy of which naturally went to Count Kessler, without whom Maillol would probably never have visited Greece [ill. 20].

On May 30, after postponing the end of the trip for a week as the time for departure approached, Maillol paid a final visit to the Acropolis in Athens, noting with emotion: “I’m going to bid you farewell – Parthenon – propylaea – erectheion – caryatids, which seem to me to be the highest summit to which sculpture can reach – I bid you farewell – but not forever, I hope”.

ill 16. « Le Doryphore » of Polyclitus marble copy probably from the Naples archaeological museum, June 1908, photography Harry Kessler, archive de la Fondation Dina Vierny – Musée Maillol.

ill19  Aristide Maillol modeling a terracotta statuette with a male model in Greece, between 23 and 27 May 1908, photography Harry Kessler, archive de la Fondation Dina Vierny – Musée Maillol.

ill 20. Le Jeune homme, 1908-1930, bronze, H. 31 cm, Fondation Dina Vierny – Musée Maillol.
ill 20. Le Jeune homme, 1908-1930, bronze, H. 31 cm, Fondation Dina Vierny – Musée Maillol.

étapes du voyage de Maillol en grèce

étapes du voyage de Maillol en grèce

  • 25 avril
    départ de Marseille

  • 26 et 27 avril
    étape à Naples

  • 28-29 avril
    visite de Messine et Taormine

  • 30 avril au 5 mai
    Athènes

  • 4 mai
    Eleusis, Daphni

  • 6 au 15 mai
    Delphes

  • 16 au 18 mai
    Olympie

  • 23 au 30 mai
    Phalère

  • 31 mai au 1er juin Athènes,
    début du voyage de retour
  • 2 juin
    Messine

  • 3 juin
    Naples

  • 4 juin
    retour à Marseille

Bibliographie

– Judith Cladel, Maillol, sa vie, son œuvre, ses idées, Paris, Bernard Grasset, 1937.

– Henri Frère, Conversations de Maillol, Paris, Somogy Edition d’art, 2016.

– Comte Harry Kessler, Journal : Regards sur l’art et les artistes contemporains, 1889– 1937, Paris : Éditions de la Maison des sciences de l’homme, 2017.
Disponible en ligne : https://books.openedition.org/editionsmsh/10902?lang=fr

– Ursel Berger et Jörg Zutter, Aristide Maillol, catalogue de l’exposition, Musée cantonal des Beaux-Arts, Lausanne, du 15 mai au 22 septembre 1996

– Alex Susanna, Maillol et la Grèce, catalogue de l’exposition, Museu Frederic Marès, Barcelone, du 27 avril 2015 au 31 janvier 2016, édition
Ajuntament de Barcelona, 2015 – textes en catalan et en français.

– Aristide Maillol, Nathalie Houzé (transcription), Notes d’un voyage en Grèce, 2015, Institute de Cultura de Barcelona.

Découvrez aussi

Prenez le meilleur du Musée Maillol en devenant membre

Maillol et la grèce

Le rapport qu’entretient Maillol 
à la sculpture grecque détermine 
en partie la place qu’il tient dans 
la sculpture du XXème siècle.
 

temps de lecture : 1h30m

Le rapport qu’entretient Maillol à la sculpture grecque détermine en partie la place qu’il tient dans la sculpture du XXème siècle. Très tôt, la critique d’art et les biographes associent Maillol et la Grèce, faisant de lui un légataire de la sculpture grecque antique, vivant tel un berger de l’Arcadie dans sa métairie reculée de Banyuls. Mais cette légende de « Maillol le grec » est à nuancer, car à la différence d’un sculpteur académiste ou classique, Maillol ne fait pas de la sculpture grecque une règle absolue qui lui commanderait la manière de concevoir son œuvre. Il préfère plutôt entrer en résonance avec celle-ci.


Si Maillol visite la Grèce durant l’été 1908, ce serait une erreur de penser qu’il ne possède pas déjà une connaissance profonde de son art. Cela passe par les visites au Louvre, la lecture d’ouvrages et surtout la recherche de photographies. Maillol est ainsi largement familier de cet art, mais son travail évolue dans des directions bien différentes : il ne compose pas selon des canons prédéfinis, mais plutôt de manière sensible selon une architecture et des volumes que lui seul détermine. Il ne porte d’ailleurs pas tellement d’intérêt pour la sculpture tardive hellénistique ni pour la période classique dominée par le sculpteur Phidias. Il préfère le style dit « sévère » : sa prédilection va vers les sculptures du temple de Zeus à Olympie [ill. 1].

ill 1. Maillol assis au musée d’Olympie, devant les sculptures du Fronton Ouest du temple de Zeus, entre le 14 et le 17 mai 1908, photographe Harry Kessler, archive de la Fondation Dina Vierny – Musée Maillol.

“ Il préfère le style 
dit « sévère » : sa prédilection va vers les sculptures du temple de Zeus à Olympie ”

Aristide Maillol

Parcours du voyage 
en Grèce : voir 
« du marbre au soleil »

Dès 1904, suite à un bref séjour ensemble à Londres, le comte Kessler et Maillol méditent un voyage en Grèce. En effet, rien qu’en visitant le British Museum qui possède une collection considérable d’antiques, Maillol déclare à Kessler : « Ce voyage à Londres aura été une éclaircie pour moi. J’ai mieux compris la sculpture et l’art en général. À Paris, les Phidias m’avaient toujours un peu étonné, mais ici, je les ai compris. » Cette visite a été en quelque sorte le premier « véritable » contact de Maillol avec l’antiquité grecque.


Voyager en Grèce laisse Maillol rêveur. Il écrit en 1907 à Maurice Denis qu’il voudrait s’asseoir pendant un mois sous l’Erechtheion : « c’est cela que j’envisage pour le moment comme une grande joie » [ill. 2] En 1908, le projet se concrétise. Pierre Camo souligne dans sa biographie de Maillol que ce voyage est l’événement capital de sa vie. C’est en effet enfin l’endroit où Maillol peut voir les statues in situ : « Je voudrais voir des statues de marbre dehors, dans le pays où elles ont été faites », écrit-il à Pierre Camo. A Maurice Denis, il précise : « je ne vous cache pas ma grande joie de voir un temple grec, des colonnes de marbre en plein soleil et même de la sculpture dehors. […] Ce qui compte surtout ma foi plus que d’aller voir le chef-d’œuvre de l’architecture c’est que je verrai du marbre 
au soleil ».

Aristide Maillol, lettre à Maurice Denis

ill. 2 Aristide Maillol, lettre à Maurice Denis, c. 1907, archive Musée départemental Maurice Denis – Archives départementales des Yvelines) inv. : Ms. 11842
– disponible en ligne : https://archives.yvelines.fr/rechercher/archives-en-ligne/correspondances-du-musee-departemental-maurice-denis

Finalement, Maillol se rendra avec le comte Kessler en Grèce du 25 avril au 3 juin 1908. Ce voyage est connu par deux sources principales : la première est le journal de Kessler [Ill. 3] et la seconde est absolument exceptionnelle puisqu’il s’agit d’un carnet de voyage, rempli de notes et de quelques croquis, que Maillol entreprit durant son séjour. Il s’agit d’une pratique rarissime chez l’artiste, qui prouve la nature extraordinaire de ce voyage à ses yeux.

Si au début, l’écrivain autrichien Hugo von Hofmannsthal est présent, il quittera le voyage, ne se satisfaisant pas de ce qu’il voit et se sentant de trop dans le duo entre Kessler et Maillol. [Ill.4]

ill. 4 Aristide Maillol et Hugo von Hofmannsthal à Delphes, mai 1908, photographie Harry Kessler, Marbach, Deutsches Literaturarchiv Marbach | © Deutsches Literaturarchiv Marbach, Nachlass Harry Graf Kessler.

ill. 3 Harry Kessler, Journal, fac-similé du manuscrit, 13 et 14 mai 1908, avec une photographie prise par Harry Kessler, montrant Aristide Maillol sur le site du temple d’Apollon à Delphes, Marbach, Deutsches Literaturarchiv Marbach | © Deutsches Literaturarchiv Marbach, Nachlass Harry Graf Kessler.

guillemets-ouverture

je ne vous cache pas ma grande joie de voir un temple grec, des colonnes de marbre en plein soleil et même de la sculpture dehors. […] Ce qui compte surtout ma foi plus que d’aller voir le chef-d’œuvre de l’architecture c’est que je verrai du marbre au soleil

guillemets-fermeture

Aristide Maillol

Regards 
de Maillol 
sur la grèce

L’une des raisons du départ de Hofmannsthal fut que le pays grec ne ressemblait en aucun point à ce qu’il attendait. Maillol, au contraire, ne se sentit pas dépaysé. Paradoxalement, l’artiste est frappé par la ressemblance entre les paysages grecs et ceux de la campagne de Banuyls. « Je me crois dans mon village d’ailleurs la même la végétation étant la même l’illusion serait complète si les espaces n’étaient ici 10 fois multipliés » note-t-il


Les premières impressions de la Grèce mentionnées dans le carnet de voyage sont sur le paysage. Il décrit très vite « un chemin contourné premiers aspects de la maison sur une colline brûlée maisons peintes en rose et en bleu, je vois un motif à peindre tout de suite – je dis je peindrai cela, car j’ai bien l’intention d’emporter quelques peintures comme souvenir. » Il joint le geste à la parole, et il a été conservé de ce voyage deux petites peintures [ill. 6 et ill. 7] qui représentent les monuments antiques. Le travail de lumière rosée montre l’intérêt de Maillol pour sa réverbération sur la blancheur des pierres.

ill. 5 Aristide Maillol à Olympie dans les ruines du supposé « atelier de Phidias », entre le 16 et le 18 mai 1908, photographe Harry Kessler, archive de la Fondation Dina Vierny – Musée Maillol.

Ill. 7 Paysage de Grèce, l’Acropole, mai 1908, huile sur toile, 30×40 cm, Fondation Dina Vierny – Musée Maillol.

ill. 3 Harry Kessler, Journal, fac-similé du manuscrit, 13 et 14 mai 1908, avec une photographie prise par Harry Kessler, montrant Aristide Maillol sur le site du temple d’Apollon à Delphes, Marbach, Deutsches Literaturarchiv Marbach | © Deutsches Literaturarchiv Marbach, Nachlass Harry Graf Kessler.

Ill. 8 Page du carnet de voyage d’Aristide Maillol : croquis d’un berger ou paysan grec , folio 53, mai 1908, archive de la Fondation Dina Vierny – Musée Maillol.

Maillol est également sensible à la vie quotidienne. Il commente et croque les passants et leurs vêtements qu’il croise sur son chemin : « la route est partout très jolie on est bien en Grèce – partout les paysans ont réellement l’air heureux leur costume est très curieux – leurs jambes sont très serrées et moulées dans un caleçon blanc – souliers en cuir pointus surmontés d’une oupe [sic – pour :houppe] – jupon blanc – ou casaque en poils de chèvre ». [ill. 8 et ill. 9]


Début mai, aux alentours de Delphes, Maillol et Kessler apprennent qu’une fête se déroule pendant trois jours au village d’Arachova, et ils s’y rendent alors à dos de mulet [Ill. 10]. L’artiste est étonné de la similitude des danses avec celles de sa région natale, notamment avec la danse « contrapàs » [ill. 11]. Maillol commente également des œuvres d’art : la première citée est « l’Apollon à l’Omphalos » dont il loue « la sérénité de la forme puissante sans fadaises ».

Ill. 9 Un berger grec, photographe Harry Kessler, mai 1908, archive de la Fondation Dina Vierny – Musée Maillol.

ill. 10 Aristide Maillol à dos de mulet en route vers Arachova, photographe Harry Kessler, 7 mai 1908, archive de la Fondation Dina Vierny – Musée Maillol.

Par ce voyage, Maillol désire voir la Grèce dans toute son entièreté, et non plus des morceaux prélevés vus en musées ; il veut regarder les œuvres d’art dans leur climat originel. Cette aspiration, décrite à Pierre Camo et à Maurice Denis, d’observer les productions grecques sous la lumière et en plein air est pleinement assouvie : « J’ai ici dans les ruines la joie de voir enfin ce que j’étais venu chercher une statue en plein air – mais hélas complètement mutilée – c’est égal je la vois toute baignée de lumière l’ombre n’existe pas ici – l’air est si limpide que l’ombre est aussi lumineuse que la lumière ». [Ill.12].


Cette réflexion de la sculpture dans son environnement naturel et son interaction avec la lumière est en réalité une préoccupation présente depuis longtemps dans la pratique du sculpteur. Maillol considère d’ailleurs sa sculpture Méditerranée comme une « jeune fille en plein air », soulignant ainsi le rôle de l’atmosphère environnant qui confère de la vie à la figure.

Ill. 11 Une danse grecque pendant une fête dans le village d’Arachova, c. 7-10 mai 1908, photographe Harry Kessler, archive de la Fondation Dina Vierny – Musée Maillol.

Ill. 12 Vue d’une sculpture dans une ruine, mai 1908, photographe Harry Kessler, Archives de la Fondation Dina Vierny – Musée Maillol.

Dialogue avec son oeuvre

L’expérience que retire Maillol de son voyage en Grèce à l’âge de quarante-sept ans n’est pas de l’ordre l’apprentissage. Il n’est plus un jeune artiste cherchant de nouveaux modèles ou des sources d’inspirations pour son œuvre à venir. Il en tire plutôt une forme de résonance, une confirmation de son art et de sa pensée. Voir les œuvres grecques sur place lui confirme plutôt la justesse des formules plastiques qu’il élabore en sculpture depuis les années 1900.


Il apprécie d’ailleurs particulièrement les antiques qui ont une certaine affinité avec certaines de ses œuvres. Il loue par exemple la figure de « l’esclave assis » de la façade Est du temple de Zeus, conservé au Musée d’Olympie, dont la position constitue un pendant masculin à sa propre petite étude pour Méditerranée. [Ill. 13 et ill. 14]


Maillol vante à Kessler les qualités de simplicités de cette sculpture : « Oui, ils [les sculpteurs grecs] n’ont pas cherché midi à quatorze heures, ces gens-là, comme les modernes : c’est simple… comme la nature. » Maillol y voit le principe de la simplification formelle qui fait apparaître l’œuvre dans toute son entièreté au spectateur, principe qu’il a déjà tenté de mettre en œuvre dans Méditerranée.

ill. 13 Sculpture de « l’Esclave assis », Fronton Est du temple de Zeus, conservé au Musée d’Olympie, avril-juin 1908, photographe Harry Kessler, archives de la Fondation Dina Vierny – Musée Maillol.

ill. 14 La Méditerranée, 1923 terre cuite, 18,2 x 13 cm, Fondation Dina Vierny – Musée Maillol.

Maillol a donc une pensée originale sur l’art antique, qu’il ne regarde pas comme un modèle à suivre, mais comme un héritage dont il faut faire table rase pour trouver une expression nouvelle en sculpture. Ainsi, il critique Bourdelle de faire des Héraklès ou des Minerves.
« Sommes-nous en Grèce pour faire des Minerves ? Il faut faire des choses de son temps. Il n’a jamais été foutu de faire une femme nue. » C’est pourquoi Maillol dit à Kessler qu’il préfère « encore être bête devant la nature que savant. »


Ainsi, Maillol dessine quelques œuvres d’après les antiques vues dans les musées ou quelques monuments [ill. 15], mais l’œuvre qui résulte de ce voyage ne tire aucunement son esthétique de l’antiquité, mais bien du regard de Maillol sur nature, d’après un modèle masculin, sujet rarissime dans sa production sculptée.

“ Sommes-nous en Grèce pour faire des Minerves ? Il faut faire des choses de son temps. Il n’a jamais été foutu de faire une femme nue. ”

Aristide Maillol

Ill. 15 Page du carnet de voyage : croquis annoté 
« erectheion [sic] et parthénon », folio 102, mai-juin 1908, archive de la Fondation Dina Vierny – Musée Maillol.

Un nu masculin Grec

Outre les quelques dessins de sculptures ou de monuments que Maillol réalise, la seule œuvre qu’il ramène de ce voyage est un nu masculin réalisé d’après nature qui ne tient aucunement leçon de l’esthétique antique.


La période du voyage en Grèce correspond à une attention particulière portée sur le nu masculin. Maillol semble tant s’intéresser à cette question qu’il assure à Kessler qu’il utilisera ce qu’il a vu en Grèce pour exécuter « un bonhomme vers lequel je me dirige ». Plus précisément, il compte puiser dans « l’Apollon Domphalos » et « le Doryphore » – pris en photo par Kessler [ill. 16] – et les études graphiques et modelées faites sur place [ill. 17 et ill. 18]


A la fin de leur séjour, entre le 23 et le 29 mai, Maillol regarde et dessine des hommes fréquentant la plage de Phalère. Il demande alors à l’un de ces baigneurs, Angelos Mantheou Chromatopoulos, de poser pour une statue. Maillol s’enthousiasme : « Avec de tels modèles, c’est pas étonnant qu’ils [les artistes grecs] aient été de grands sculpteurs ». Sa démarche est ainsi de rechercher ce qu’un sculpteur grec antique a pu voir « dans la nature ».

ill. 16 Page du carnet de voyage : croquis annoté 
« erectheion [sic] et parthénon », folio 102, mai-juin 1908, archive de la Fondation Dina Vierny – Musée Maillol.

ill. 17 & ill. 18 Etudes, figures masculines dans diverses poses, issue d’un carnet de croquis, mai 1908, Fondation Dina Vierny – Musée Maillol.

Maillol se munit de ce qui lui est nécessaire pour travailler sa sculpture avec les moyens du bord : il trouve sur la plage un morceau de bois pour servir de support, ainsi que du fil de fer, du bois souple et de la toile métallique pour servir de base. Le propriétaire de l’hôtel leur offre un coin ombragé du jardin afin de servir d’atelier improvisé. [Ill. 19]


La terre réalisée sur place n’est pas identifiée à ce jour. Toutefois, Maillol, de retour en France, n’oublie pas cette sculpture élaborée en 1908 et ce n’est qu’en 1930 qu’il réalise un bronze à partir de cette étude, dont un exemplaire revint naturellement au comte Kessler, sans qui Maillol ne se serait sans doute jamais rendu en Grèce [ill. 20].


Le 30 mai, après avoir repoussé la fin du voyage d’une semaine, l’heure du départ approchant, Maillol visite une dernière fois l’Acropole d’Athènes et il note, ému : « je vais vous dire adieu – Parthénon – propylées – erectheion – cariatides qui me paraissez être le sommet plus haut sommet où puisse arriver la sculpture – je vous dis adieu – mais pas pour toujours j’espère »

ill. 19 Aristide Maillol modelant une statuette en terre cuite avec un modèle masculin en Grèce, entre le 23 et le 27 mai 1908, photographe Harry Kessler, archive de la Fondation Dina Vierny – Musée Maillol.

ill. 20 Le Jeune homme, 1908-1930, bronze,
H. 31 cm, Fondation Dina Vierny – Musée Maillol.

étapes du voyage de Maillol en grèce

  • 25 avril
    départ de Marseille

  • 26 et 27 avril
    étape à Naples

  • 28-29 avril
    visite de Messine et Taormine

  • 30 avril au 5 mai
    Athènes

  • 4 mai
    Eleusis, Daphni

  • 6 au 15 mai
    Delphes

  • 16 au 18 mai
    Olympie

  • 23 au 30 mai
    Phalère

  • 31 mai au 1er juin Athènes,
    début du voyage de retour
  • 2 juin
    Messine

  • 3 juin
    Naples

  • 4 juin
    retour à Marseille

Bibliographie

– Judith Cladel, Maillol, sa vie, son œuvre, ses idées, Paris, Bernard Grasset, 1937.

– Henri Frère, Conversations de Maillol, Paris, Somogy Edition d’art, 2016.

– Comte Harry Kessler, Journal : Regards sur l’art et les artistes contemporains, 1889– 1937, Paris : Éditions de la Maison des sciences de l’homme, 2017.
Disponible en ligne : https://books.openedition.org/editionsmsh/10902?lang=fr

– Ursel Berger et Jörg Zutter, Aristide Maillol, catalogue de l’exposition, Musée cantonal des Beaux-Arts, Lausanne, du 15 mai au 22 septembre 1996

– Alex Susanna, Maillol et la Grèce, catalogue de l’exposition, Museu Frederic Marès, Barcelone, du 27 avril 2015 au 31 janvier 2016, édition
Ajuntament de Barcelona, 2015 – textes en catalan et en français.

– Aristide Maillol, Nathalie Houzé (transcription), Notes d’un voyage en Grèce, 2015, Institute de Cultura de Barcelona.

Découvrez aussi

La conquête des Etats-Unis

La conquête des Etats-Unis

La conquête des Etats-Unis

Subscribe to our newsletter

Follow us on our social medias

Mentions légales | CGU | Données personnelles | Gestion des cookies

Musée Maillol, 2021

Mentions légales | CGU | Données personnelles | Gestion des cookies

Musée Maillol, 2021

Musée Maillol, 2021